Helping Teens Develop Financial Literacy

BY PR Newswire | AGENCY | 09/29/22 12:42 PM EDT

MISSION, Kan., Sept. 29, 2022 /PRNewswire/ --?(Family Features) Developing financial knowledge and effective money management habits are important steppingstones for teenagers to become financially stable adults who aspire to build assets and achieve personal goals.

Photo courtesy of Getty Images

For example, most teens (88%) would like to own a home someday, according to a survey conducted by Wakefield Research on behalf of Junior Achievement USA and Fannie Mae. The survey of 1,000 teens ages 13-17 in the United States found most (85%) believe "owning a home" is part of "the good life," compared to nearly as many adults (87%). However, fewer than half (45%) could correctly identify the definition of a home mortgage and 76% said they lacked clear understanding of credit scores.

"There's been this theme that younger Americans aren't interested in homeownership, but the results of this survey contradict that assumption," said Jack E. Kosakowski, president and CEO of Junior Achievement USA. "Teens appear interested in owning a home someday but seem to realize they need more information on how to do it."

To help teens gain a better understanding of financial decisions they'll face in adulthood, consider these common terms.

Credit Score

While nearly all teens (96%) believe credit scores play an important role in the ability to purchase a home, approximately 3 in 4 (76%) said they understood credit scores only "somewhat," "a little" or "not at all." A credit score is a number from 300-850 based on a number of factors, including credit history, open accounts, total debt, repayment history and more. Lenders use credit scores to evaluate a person's ability to repay loans.

A person's credit score may also determine the size of a down payment needed when purchasing a smartphone or home, or the deposit needed for renting property or obtaining utilities and may impact interest rates and credit limits on credit cards. Generally, scores below 620 may require paying a higher rate, a shorter repayment term or a co-signer. Scores of 700 or higher are considered more favorable to creditors and may result in lower interest rates while scores higher than 800 typically provide the most benefits to consumers.

Mortgage

While a slight majority of white teens (52%) correctly identified the definition of a mortgage, only around a quarter (26%) of Black teens and fewer than half (41%) of Hispanic or Latino teens could do so. A mortgage is a type of loan used to purchase or maintain a home, land or other types of real estate. The borrower makes a down payment for a portion of the purchase price then borrows the rest from a lender. The borrower then repays the lender over a number of years ? typically 15-30 ? via a series of regular payments that are divided into principal (the money originally borrowed) and interest with the property serving as security.

Nearly all teens surveyed (97%) thought it would be helpful if schools offered lessons that explained homeownership, including mortgages. In response, Fannie Mae is supporting the development and deployment of Junior Achievement learning experiences for thousands of students annually in various age groups by integrating relevant content from its HomeView homeownership course materials and resources, which are designed with first-time homebuyers in mind.

"Young people today are the homebuyers of tomorrow," said Jeffery Hayward, executive vice president and chief administrative officer, Fannie Mae. "By providing them access to quality, foundational education now, Fannie Mae and Junior Achievement are helping these future homeowners prepare for the mortgage and homebuying process when they're ready to take that step."

Visit ja.org for more tips and information to help teens improve their financial knowledge and reach their goals.

Photo courtesy of Getty Images

Michael French
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